classic

The Catcher in the Rye

The Catcher in the Rye

What a wonderful book! I mean it. Holden Caulfield now holds a dear place in my heart. Next to Ishmael, from Moby Dick, Holden Caulfield has become one of my most beloved male characters in all of literature. I found the beginning of the book is a bit annoying, I confess, but as his narrative unfolds I began to identify with those feelings of solitude, of not knowing your place in the world. It brought up memories of my own adolescence. He was stuck halfway between being a child and an adult and sort of tumbled through those days following his expulsion. I remember days like those when all those new emotions and experiences felt overwhelming and you felt the urge to give in to something as childish as bursting into tears when you found that you weren’t quite ready to tackle the adult world, but did not feel quite like a child any longer; and thinking that everyone in the world was a phony and being aware of my own phoniness. Read more…

Rebecca

Rebecca

Randy, one of my online buddies, recommended I read  this classic of Gothic Romance written by Dame Daphne Du Maurier.  Since I have been so faithful to not keeping up with the reading list I set up for myself I decided to give it a try.  Rebecca is a lovely, old fashioned book with a solid plot and some very interesting characters.  We have the narrator of the story, a young, naive girl that works as a companion for a rich American woman, and Maxim De Winter, a forty something widower, owner of Manderley — a great old estate in Cornwall.  He is haunted by the dead of his lovely, sylph like wife Rebecca and goes to  the South of France on a holiday.  He meets the narrator there  and marries her in a whim.  He takes her to his great estate Manderley to be the new Mrs. De Winter, but the shadow of Rebecca haunts her every turn.  What exactly happens… well, you have to read it to find out! Read more…

Wide Sargasso Sea

Wide Sargasso Sea

What a captivating, interesting book! Jean Rhys managed to create a tense, mysteriously haunting world in very few pages. The heat, the smell of orange blossoms and sweet cinnamon all assault your senses as you read Rhys’s fantastic account on the mysterious woman in the attic from Bronte’s Jane Eyre. I am deeply captivated by this author’s take on dementia and people’s reaction to others suffering of that affliction. Afro-Caribbean traditions and prejudices play a significant part in the plot, I recommend that you read up a bit on the history of the West Indies and Caribbean before taking up this book in order to understand it fully. Read more…

2012 Reading Challenge

2012 Reading Challenge
Vivian has read 23 books toward her goal of 100 books.
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